Scouting & International.

Hello Dear Reader

We now live in what can be described as a digital age. It is a time where messages can be sent around the globe in a matter of seconds, with tools like Whatsapp, Facetime and Skype we can talk and discuss with people from all over the world.

With all this at our fingertips can someone please explain to me why there are still people involved in scouting who believe that International is difficult to do, and that to get an international experience you need to get on a plane and travel?
There are simple things you can do, combine international with the writer’s badge

From the Writers Badge

  • Write a letter to a pen pal (real or imaginary) of at least 150 words.- do it via e-mail

From the Global Challenge

  • Make contact with Scouts from another country outside the United Kingdom.

Ok as an adult you need to do a little bit of work in making the initial contact but a simple search of the web will find blogs for a huge number of America Scout groups, I admit this is a simple way out because there is no language barrier but no-one said the challenge had to be difficult.
After a couple of e-mails, I am sure you can find a way to share information in such a way to comply with everyone’s child protection and data protection rules.

Ok, that is only one part you need a project well again there are a wealth of NGO and organisations who would love to share their message with a group of young people. Only the other day I was in a pub and overheard a conversation with a guy who worked for Outreach International who are based near Bristol. It turned out he was James Chapman the Founder and having introduced myself he seemed very interested in coming and doing a talk to people in Scouting about the projects they work on and what they do.

So tell me why is International deemed to be so difficult?

Yours in Scouting

K

Comments

  1. Ben Davidson

    Because it involves making some time and effort. Scouting obviously reflects the society we live in, and today we live in a society where people want everything done for them on a plate. Why do you think most Scouting leaders resources are geared towards providing ‘Programmes on a Plate’. But Scouting is also an organisation that should take the blame as well, if you regularly read Scouting (and it’s hard sometimes) but nearly every copy goes on about this big international experience A and this big international experience B. Mailing off some emails and and so on would be seen by some as not showing much effort sadly. So people don’t bother. People should do what you have suggested and they do, but you never hear about it, because it’s not deemed worthy enough or ‘is that it’.

  2. Scotland

    I generally find the international stuff really easy to do, mind you that is aided by the fact that I have been on a number of international trips with the scouts in the past.

    To be honest, I am currently organising a trip to Kandersteg for my scouts, but I do realise that the big trips arn’t for everyone… mainly cause a load of them can’t afford it! So I have done nights in the past where I have picked a country and themed the evening round it. I’ve done Mongolian and Chinese nights in the past which have gone down really well, especially when you get them cooking traditional food from those countries.

    I would also suggest asking for people that have been to World Jamborees etc to come down to the hall so that they can talk through their experiences and maybe run one or two games they learned while out there.

  3. Kiff

    Scotland

    Part of the trouble is that link between International and going away. You do follow it up very nicely by saying you can do country nights.

    I was perticularly refering to the International Badge

    YIS

    K

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